Visualizing Current Flow

Tell us the story of your project: 

I tend to help people out when they have electronics projects they want advice on. I have a basic understanding of electronics, and don't really know how electricity works. I had that idea that creating a visualization of the electron flow within a circuit might help me understand better what's going on, and this is my attempt to accomplish that.

A few things to understand before you go in, I used electron flow and my interpretation of what's going on within a circuit to make this visualization. If you don't agree with how I displayed things, that's totally fine, and a whole lot of people would probably agree with you. There's a whole bunch of conflicting arguments about what's going on at the electron level since we can't see what's going on there, that's why I made this, and that's why no one can be right. Personally, I ascribe to Kenn Amdahl's view of tiny green men who just like to party. It actually makes the most sense to anything I've read.

How-to: 

To create (or edit) this, you'll need a computer capable of running:

Processing with ControlP5 libraries. If you have a Raspberri Pi, you have a strong enough computer to accomplish this.

Download the zipped application resources, add the zipped folder to your Processing library, and feel free to play around.

(This program works as of versions 2.04 of Controlp5 and 2.0 Processing.)

Share a "Show & Tell" video.: 
https://www.youtube.com/embed/rg8dMVCfwSM
Collaborators: 
matthew
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Computer
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Processing
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Processing Files
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Team member name: 
matthew
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6
Teaser: 
I created a visualization showing electron flow within a circuit in order to help friends understand how different decisions affect the heat, power, current, and voltage through a circuit.
Aha! moment: 
This really helped solidify the math behind figuring out specifics across a circuit, which was awesome.
Uh-oh! moment: 
Looking back at the code a year later to update it...I realized that it might be easier to start from scratch then to build this out more.
Show & Tell video as default: 

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